Universities in Netherlands are asked to stop marketing their programs to international students

Universities in Netherlands are asked to stop marketing their programs to international students, Verbalists Education

The universities in Netherlands are asked to stop marketing their degree courses to international students in order to cut the number of overfilled classrooms and reduce their impact on the country’s housing shortage.


Universities in Netherlands are asked to stop marketing their programs to international students Verbalists Education Beyond Borders Podcast

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The request is made by the Dutch parliament to reduce the number of international students heading to the Netherlands as the lack of student accommodation continues to be an issue.

Accommodation presents a particular problem, as the majority of Dutch students live at home and commute to university for free on the country’s rail network. Consequently, students are accepting accommodations at greater and greater distances away from their campus as the housing shortage continues to bite.

International students are especially hard-hit by the shortage. In July, the University of Amsterdam told international students not to come to the capital if they haven’t found a place to stay beforehand.

Foreign students now make up 25% of all first-year students in the Netherlands, and when it comes to the Netherlands’ scientific and research universities, 40% of all first-year students come from abroad.

Seventy-six per cent of foreign students in Netherlands are from the European Union, the majority of these being German citizens. Netherlands has become a popular study destination for the European Union students because of the number of English-medium degrees on offer and the low annual fees of between €500 and €2,100.

Numbers of students from outside the European Union, who pay fees of between €6,000 and €15,000 at undergraduate level, have also been growing, especially from India and China.

According to the government research, international students are three times as likely as their Dutch peers to drop out in their first year, but around 60% go on to finish their degree, which is roughly the same percentage as for local students. Due to this drop-out rate, a quarter of international students did not graduate after four years, in comparison to nine per cent of Dutch students.


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